Author Archives: Greg Ashman

Understanding the PISA 2015 findings about science teaching

Originally posted on Filling the pail:
I have shared the following graphic a few times. It shows that frequent use of enquiry-based learning, as defined by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), is associated with worse scores on…

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The bad ideas holding Australia back

Originally posted on Filling the pail:
Embed from Getty Images This week saw more evidence of Australia falling behind its international peers. A new study found that Year 6 students’ aptitude for science has not improved in a decade. In my…

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The debate in the staffroom

Originally posted on Filling the pail:
Embed from Getty Images Back in the early 2000s, I was the head of science at a government school in London. I didn’t read education research at that time. Instead, it came to us…

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Why is teacher education doing such a bad job?

Originally posted on Filling the pail:
Embed from Getty Images I recently discovered a new Aussie blogger named Anthony Sibillin. Pleased as I am that a new voice has joined the community, I am dismayed by what he had to…

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Michael Anderson’s Crystal Ball

Originally posted on Filling the pail:
Embed from Getty Images In an article for the Sydney Morning Herald, Michael Anderson, Professor of Education at The University of Sydney, stares into his crystal ball and asks, “How can we prepare kids for…

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How to win an argument in education

Originally posted on Filling the pail:
Embed from Getty Images When the world didn’t end in a great flood as predicted on the 21st December 1954, the followers of Dorothy Martin were presented with a thorny problem. Many had given…

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Chasing the constructivist rainbow

Originally posted on Filling the pail:
Embed from Getty Images Many teachers start their careers with the idea that implicit forms of instruction are somehow better than simply explaining things to students. This probably originates in teacher training institutions with…

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