Author Archives: Greg Ashman

Teachers should have university degrees

Originally posted on Filling the pail:
Embed from Getty Images There is an interesting debate raging in the U.K. after the government proposed a wholly vocational route into teaching. Although it is intended to be a ‘degree equivalent’, trainee teachers…

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Eliminating anxiety in schools

Originally posted on Filling the pail:
Embed from Getty Images There are valid arguments against standardised tests. They have the potential to distort the curriculum by focusing teachers on only those subjects that are tested. And they can be unfair…

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Do students learn more from who their teachers are?

Originally posted on Filling the pail:
Embed from Getty Images Do students learn more from who their teachers are than from what they actually teach them? This is an appealing idea to many of us and I can see its…

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Some thoughts on turning around tough schools

Originally posted on Filling the pail:
Embed from Getty Images Near the end of December, 2000, I was sat in the staffroom listening to my head of department speak. After he had finished his introduction, he invited me up to…

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Take it back

Originally posted on Filling the pail:
Embed from Getty Images I meet a lot of new teachers from a range of Australian universities. When I talk to them, they are full of enthusiasm for inquiry learning, project-based learning and other…

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New report on Cognitive Load Theory aimed at teachers

Originally posted on Filling the pail:
Embed from Getty Images I have been researching Cognitive Load Theory (CLT) for a couple of years now. During that time, I’ve blogged about CLT and I’ve often been asked if there is a…

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Speaking out

Originally posted on Filling the pail:
Embed from Getty Images I recently met someone with a senior role in Australian education. As is often the case when talking to someone for the first time, the discussion began with potted biographies.…

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