Author Archives: David Didau

Building Automaticity in Handwriting

English teachers seem to attract a lot of comments about students’ handwriting. Parents are often keen to discuss it at parents’ evenings, often pushing it as a discussion point over other importan… Source: Building Automaticity in Handwriting Advertisements

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In Defence of Similes

Originally posted on All Ears:
Last week, when a year 12 English literature student told me that a simile was “describing something using like or as” I was perturbed. Okay, so they were sort of right. But surely, in an…

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How Measurement Fails Doctors and Teachers (Robert Wachter)

Originally posted on Larry Cuban on School Reform and Classroom Practice:
“Robert M. Wachter is a professor and the interim chairman of the department of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and the author of “The Digital Doctor:…

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No more marking? Not quite

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Mark my words

Originally posted on Matthew Evans:
Any economist knows that people respond to incentives. Senior leaders in schools should bear this in mind when they seek to hold teachers to account. Pay attention to a behaviour and generally you’ll see more…

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“But I told you this only last lesson, Year 11!” Memory Strategy 3, Part 1

Originally posted on teenschooling:
We’ve all been there. Laboured like the sower in Mark’s parable?to impart information one lesson only to discover the next that most of our seed fell on stony ground “where it did not have much soil…

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Learning is Invisible – a summary of a presentation by David Didau at the London Festival of Education 2015

Originally posted on Still learning.:
A few months ago I attended a very popular presentation given by award-winning publisher and English-teaching specialist, David Didau. In the presentation he challenged the perceived notion of learning in the classroom being visible. He…

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