Monthly Archives: May 2019

What’s the big deal with Big Questions? – David Didau: The Learning Spy

You might know them as Fertile Questions, Enquiry Questions, or plain old, Big Questions, but the idea that the curriculum ought to be organised around broad, disciplinary, substantive enquires is a… Continued here http://bit.ly/2HKU9Me Advertisements

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The Baron: Can teachers be trusted to teach primary school pu…

The Baron: Can teachers be trusted to teach primary school pu…: Anderton Park Primary School has found itself at the centre of what some would characterise as a dispute between two very different value …

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What do inference, creativity, problem solving and happiness have in common?

Originally posted on The Quirky Teacher:
They’re all outcomes, the final performance. The evidence-informed among us know that you can’t get better at the final performance by just practising the final performance. And this whole blog is about how I…

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If shy kids find MFL torture, something is wrong

Originally posted on fish64:
I came across a tweet recently which saddened me. “For shy kids, MFL can feel like torture”. This was then used as an argument for ditching the opportunity to learn a second foreign language in school and…

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The Curious Case of the Year 11 Summer Returners – Education Datalab blog

While undertaking analysis of the National Pupil Database (NPD) to produce our recent post-Timpson Review blogposts (like this and this), I became intrigued by a strange phenomenon in which Year 11… Continued here: http://bit.ly/2W07klj

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Timpson Review reflections, part two: Not all pupils who have been permanently excluded end up in alternative provision – Education Datalab blog

One of two posts exploring the relationship between state-funded alternative provision and exclusion Continued here: http://bit.ly/2Huofn5

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Timpson Review reflections, part one: Not all pupils who end up in alternative provision have been permanently excluded – Education Datalab blog

One of two posts exploring the relationship between state-funded alternative provision and exclusion Continued here: http://bit.ly/2YIkwIh

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