Monthly Archives: March 2019

The Problem With ‘Woke’ Teachers

Originally posted on makingkidsclever:
I don’t just use Twitter for teaching. I use it for news. I use it to discuss sport. Sometimes I use it as a form of journaling. My Twitter feed is different to most teachers in…

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Constructing EduTwitter

Originally posted on Filling the pail:
Embed from Getty Images For reasons I cannot recall, I recently listened to this podcast in which an Australian education academic is interviewed about a book chapter he has written on teachers and social…

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Is scientific evidence ‘phallic’?

Originally posted on Filling the pail:
Embed from Getty Images Back in 2015, I wrote a series of three blog posts arguing that we need to change the way we train teachers. In Part II, I wrote about the research…

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

How do we know pupils are making progress? Part 3: Assessment – David Didau: The Learning Spy

In Part 1 of this series I set out the problems with making predictions about students’ progress by drawing a ‘flight path’ between KS2 and KS4, then, in Part 2, I explained how thinking about the… Continued here https://ift.tt/2Oufs6y

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The silliest feedback from work scrutinies

Originally posted on Scenes From The Battleground:
If you teach in a state school in England, you have probably experienced a “work scrutiny” where your superiors take some of your students’ books and try to determine something about the quality…

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

How do we know pupils are making progress? Part 2: The curriculum – David Didau: The Learning Spy

In my last post, I set out the problems with making predictions about students’ progress by drawing a ‘flight path’ between KS2 ad KS4. This posts begins to discuss what we should do instead. The… Continued here https://ift.tt/2Jzg4Zv

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

How do we know pupils are making progress? Part 1: The problem with flightpaths – David Didau: The Learning Spy

Schools are desperate to find ways to predict students’ progress from year to year and between key stages. Seemingly, the most common approach to solving this problem is to produce some sort of… Continued here https://ift.tt/2UcaCQJ

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment