Monthly Archives: September 2017

The Dangers of a Personalised Curriculum

Originally posted on Trivium21c:
Trying to fit a personalised curriculum around the desires of a child is a dangerous idea. If we only ever follow the extreme individualisation where the child’s own innate tastes are paramount we might never…

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My little homily

I’m in a reflective mood today, in part due to two things. Firstly, there have been several insightful blogs on my twitter feed this week that have stimulated my thinking juices (such as this and this). Secondly, I’ve spent the last few days … Continue reading

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Student Assessment of Learning in the Classroom

Originally posted on The Effortful Educator:
In my AP Psychology classroom, most of my students are great at memorizing facts and regurgitating them on quizzes/tests.  I spend a considerable amount of time introducing learning strategies to my students and incorporating…

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Is ‘mental health’ the new ‘dumbing down’?

Originally posted on The Quirky Teacher:
Recently, I read about school girls being encouraged to report their mood via a phone app in order to stop ‘contagious depression’ spreading. Is it just me or is it more than a coincidence…

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Outstanding Teacher Job Adverts – #rEDRugby 17 Part 3

Originally posted on sputniksteve:
In my previous post, I gave a brief comment on the changing usage of the term outstanding, noting how Google nGram Viewer reveals a shifting from its use as a term of economics to one of glorification.…

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“Outstanding” My #rEDRugby 2017 Talk Part 2

Originally posted on sputniksteve:
Yeah, I know; it’s been ages since I wrote Part 1. In this post, I want to give a brief account of observations I made about the use of the word “outstanding”. This was one of…

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Lightening the load – how to make big gains in learning by doing less.

Originally posted on BethBudden@school:
There’s so much snake oil in education that when something with the potential to really help learners comes along, there’s a chance it’s overlooked; this mustn’t be the case with cognitive load theory. The evidence…

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