Never ask pupils a question to which they have not already been told the answer.

...to the real.

Never ask pupils a question to which they have not already been told the answer, unless they know enough that answering the question requires them only inching forwards.

Years ago I wrote on questions and questioning, a seemingly important aspect of teaching.  For anyone interested, here:

28th May 2013

29th May 2013

16th June 2013

15th March 2014

Which is really all to say that despite the irreverence, three years on and the question of questions hasn’t disappeared.

At this point, I would say they are a vitally important part of teaching.  During my training I was told that they were a vitally important part of teaching.  So where did it all go wrong?  Our understanding of the role of questions is flawed.

Consider the following two views:

1 – “Never ask pupils a question to which they have not already been told the answer.”

c.f.

2 – “Use questions…

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About teachingbattleground

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One Response to Never ask pupils a question to which they have not already been told the answer.

  1. chrismwparsons says:

    Additionally, if pupils have come out with some reasoned implications of what they’ve been taught, you could furthermore ask: “What parallels or analogies can you see with other systems/areas/ideas etc. etc. etc. I’m not sure this is pushing their brains too.hard.

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