Tell Us About Your Blog (Or Somebody Else’s): The New Spreadsheet

There is now a new spreadsheet of UK Education bloggers available here, based on the latest version of the list of bloggers.

If you are a blogger, please fill in and check your details. Even if you aren’t, any time you can spare to look up and fill in details of other people’s blogs would be very much appreciated.

A few notes:

The list, and the basis for inclusion, can be found here.

The information wanted is

  • Twitter Name: People are always asking me how to find their favourite bloggers on Twitter.
  • Gender: This should be M, F,  Unknown (intended for anonymous bloggers) and N/A (intended for group blogs).
  • Subject: This is intended to identify when a blogger mainly teaches one subject. If you teach many subjects (like most primary teachers) put “N/A”.
  • Role: As broad a description as possible. Preferably just Teacher/TA/Head/Consultant/SLT. No need to say if you are an AST or have a TLR. If your position is not in the drop down list, you can type it in.
  • Sector: This is to identify what type of school, institution or organisation people specialise in. i.e. Early Years/Primary/Secondary/Special/FE/HE/Company/Charity. Please list PRUs separately from special schools.
  • Region or Country: As simple a description as possible. Use the drop down menu. If you are teaching overseas you can include the country in the notes.
  • Notes: If (and only if) something is unclear in the previous information add it here. You can identify your own company or organisation here, but please don’t do so for others.
  • Checked By Author: If you are the writer of a listed blog, put the date here if you have seen the details given about you and your blog and think them correct.
  • Not Updated Since 1st June 2014. You don’t need to fill this in, it is intended to warn you if your blog is going to go out of date soon.

The following advice may also be helpful:

  • Please don’t put anything confidential down, particularly about somebody else.
  • A number of changes have been made, so even if you have put your own details in, you may want to check that everything is still as you’d want it.
  • If you have a blog that is not in the list there is now a sheet entitled “Have we missed your blog?” on the spreadsheet where you can add a link and (if possible) your twitter name.
  • Be aware that no blogs will be added or removed from the main page of the spreadsheet until the next update, which will probably not be for another few weeks.
  • Feel free to make copies of the spreadsheet and use it how you wish. It’s meant to be for everyone’s benefit.
  • You may have trouble editing the spreadsheet on an iPad or iPhone. I’m told the trick is to find and download a Google Sheets app that will let you do this.
  • If you have access to a community of UK education bloggers who have not heard about the spreadsheet, please let them know.
  • If you are anonymous, and want to keep some information private, please make use of the “unknown” option.
  • The parts of the spreadsheet in yellow are those which were included in the last version of the spreadsheet, so that it is easier to spot the source of any errors. I will probably change the colour at some point, so don’t pay any attention to it.

Thank you.

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About teachingbattleground

I teach
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4 Responses to Tell Us About Your Blog (Or Somebody Else’s): The New Spreadsheet

  1. Pingback: Some links that may be of interest | Scenes From The Battleground

  2. Reblogged this on Kaur Gibbons' Thoughts and commented:
    An excellent Idea!

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