Differentiation, high expectations and the art of making mistakes | David Didau: The Learning Spy

“It is unrealistic … for inspectors to necessarily expect that all work in all lessons is always matched to the specific needs of each individual.”

Subsidiary guidance supporting the inspection of maintained schools and academies, December 2013

Differentiation is one of the darkest arts in teaching. The generally accepted position is that differentiation is wholly good, and this is the cause of the wracking guilt felt by harrowed teachers: it may well be good, but it’s bloody hard work. Tom Sherrington writes in his hugely popular post on differentiation that, “every class is a mixed ability class so, regardless of our views on selection or setting, all teachers need to cater for students with a range of skills, aptitudes and dispositions.” But does this mean we have to flay ourselves producing individual lesson plans for all the uniquely different little blighter we teach?

via Differentiation, high expectations and the art of making mistakes | David Didau: The Learning Spy.

 

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